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Who says Cincinnati doesn't get mobile?

Today I gave a keynote at the sold-out MobileX conference in Cincinnati.  I can't tell you how impressed I am by this group.   Brian, Therese, Evan and the entire crew did an amazing job scheduling and executing on this event, and it's no wonder it sold out.  Top notch facility and speakers.  They had camera crews throughout, so although I brought my own camera equipment as I always do to capture content, I'll likely just swap it out with theirs once it's live.

Here's video from the main keynote I did (slides are below):  The title was "Capitalizing on the Mobile Tsunami: Trends and how to Leverage them for Success."  I talk about mobile trends our company is seeing and provide a perspective of being a mobile entrepreneur for the past four years, first with the consulting company PointAbout, then the DIY app creation product AppMakr, and now with the social API Socialize.  I'd also like to credit my cofounders Sean Shadmand and Isaac Mosquera for their contributions to the content in this presentation, as we all bounce ideas off each other all day, and the final product is stellar.

Socialize & AppMakr breakout: After the keynote, I got to do a much more intimate break-out session to discuss Socialize and AppMakr in more detail.  We also touched on how to leverage social media in general, outside of mobile.   I referenced my Henry Ford blog but neglected to reference my post on why service providers should blog, which would've been perfect to discuss.

Today I gave a keynote at the sold-out MobileX conference in Cincinnati.  I can't tell you how impressed I am by this group.   Brian, Therese, Evan and the entire crew did an amazing job scheduling and executing on this event, and it's no wonder it sold out.  Top notch facility and speakers.  They had camera crews throughout, so although I brought my own camera equipment as I always do to capture content, I'll likely just swap it out with theirs once it's live. Here's video from the main keynote I did (slides are below):  The title was "Capitalizing on the Mobile Tsunami: Trends and how to Leverage them for Success."  I talk about mobile trends our company is seeing and provide a perspective of being a mobile entrepreneur for the past four years, first with the consulting company PointAbout, then the DIY app creation product AppMakr, and now with the social API Socialize.  I'd also like to credit my cofounders Sean Shadmand and Isaac Mosquera for their contributions to the content in this presentation, as we all bounce ideas off each other all day, and the final product is stellar. Socialize & AppMakr breakout: After the keynote, I got to do a much more intimate break-out session to discuss Socialize and AppMakr in more detail.  We also touched on how to leverage social media in general, outside of mobile.   I referenced my Henry Ford blog but neglected to reference my post on why service providers should blog, which would've been perfect to discuss. Slides from Keynote: Being a mobile entrepreneur Here's a great pano from the event, a relevant twitter feed below that. . //

What I Learned Negotiating With Steve Jobs

On Heidi Roizen

Fresh out of Stanford Business School, I started a software company, T/Maker, with my brother Peter. He was the software architect and I was, well, everything else. Our little company was among the first to ship software for the Macintosh, and we developed a positive reputation among the members of the nascent developer community, which led us to expanding our business by publishing software for other independent developers. Two of our developers, Randy Adams and William Parkhurst, went to work for Steve Jobs at his new company, NeXT, and that’s how I ended up head to head with Steve Jobs.

Turns out, Steve had a problem and Randy and William thought I could be the solution. Steve had done an “acquihire” of the developers who had written the Mac word processor MacAuthor. In order to make the deal economics work, Steve had promised to publish MacAuthor and pay royalties to the developers. But now, with the world’s attention on his new startup, how would it look to have NeXT’s first product be a word processor for the Mac? Randy and William suggested to Steve that if I were to be the publisher, the problem would be solved. Steve liked the idea, and invited me in to talk about it.

My first meeting with Steve lasted well over an hour. He grilled me about packaging, channels, distribution, product positioning and the like. I must have passed the test, as he invited me back to negotiate a publishing deal. I spent the next three weeks preparing detailed timelines, package mockups and drafting a very specific contract based on our experience with the other developers we had already published.

On the appointed day, after waiting in the lobby for 45 minutes (this, I would come to learn, was par for the course for meetings with Steve), I was called up to Steve’s cubicle. I remember to this day how completely nervous I felt. But I had my contract in hand and I knew my numbers cold.

Shortly into my pitch, Steve took the contract from me and scanned down to the key term, the royalty rate. I had pitched 15%, our standard. Steve pointed at it and said,

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