hide

Read Next

Entrepreneurship Is Taught Through Life, Not In The Classroom

Yesterday a group of students from my alma mater, the University of Virginia's McIntire School of Commerce, came to visit. They were spending a week in Silicon Valley as part of their spring break.

I've long privately urged McIntire to become more entrepreneur friendly. When I was a student at U.Va. in the late 90's, it was a very unfriendly place for entrepreneurs. It seems that things are finally changing, and the fact that these students were in California on spring break says a lot about their enthusiasm for tech startups. I've also written in the past about how high school students have seemed more receptive and responsive to becoming entrepreneurs than college students. It's almost like if one doesn't get introduced to the hunger to be an entrepreneur at young age, it becomes hard to impossible to stoke it later. But this trip made me feel like there's hope for helping people find a passion for entrepreneurship later in life. No matter what, though, I stressed to the students that came to visit that the passion had to come from within them. The best a school can do is support those that want it badly enough to try.

We spent an hour together, and I shared stories with them about how I paid for college by making UVa-branded Frisbees, and sold a card called the Hoos Savings Club Card. (It was way ahead of it's time -- basically an analog version of a daily deals service like Groupon). Here are some related pics:

I'd go around to shops in the Charlottesville area, get them to agree to provide discounts to students for the school year, print the discounts on the back of the card, and sell the card for $20 to students. For anyone in college today, it's a concept that would work just as well now as it did 15 years ago, and it's a great way to make $20k to $50k while you're in school, if you're willing to have a little bit of hustle.

Dear College Admissions Counselor

On Imported Blog

Dear College Admissions Counselor,

I'm an Indian-American male with an average ACT score and grades that's applying to an STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) program. I know, there's literally hundred-thousands of me.

No numbers make me stand out. Worse yet, I don't have anything to compensate for that. The essays? I struggle when I write; it's one of the reasons I started to blog. I've tried to find my "voice," yet it's still hidden.

Interviews? I'm extremely nervous and awkward when I have to talk under pressure, especially when it's to people older than me.

Rendering New Theme...