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'Fireside Chat' with Evan Williams, CEO of Twitter by Claire Cain Miller of the New York Times

I attended an event at Kicklabs tonight hosted by Girls In Tech, which was an interview of Twitter CEO Evan Williams by Claire Cain Miller of the New York Times.

Twitter has 300 people and is adding 25 to 30 people per month.  Evan says that he now "doesn't know all the people in the company anymore" as Twitter has grown.  When asked about his experience as an entrepreneur, Evan said when he started Odeo, he was "too anxious" to be an entrepreneur but the business passion didn't come from within.

Interestingly, there was no Twitter hash tag defined for the event, and and only one audience question was asked via Twitter.  Claire, the interviewer, really grilled Evan on Twitter's hiring practices & approach towards women at the company, and in tech in general.  So, a question for the comments - do you think he responded appropriately?  Should he have to be fielding those types of questions in an interview setting like the one last night?  Evan mentioned that Twitter hires women when it can, but Twitter won't hire someone "just because she's a woman."  Is that the right approach or the wrong approach?  Should there be a quota for women in tech?

I attended an event at Kicklabs tonight hosted by Girls In Tech, which was an interview of Twitter CEO Evan Williams by Claire Cain Miller of the New York Times. Twitter has 300 people and is adding 25 to 30 people per month.  Evan says that he now "doesn't know all the people in the company anymore" as Twitter has grown.  When asked about his experience as an entrepreneur, Evan said when he started Odeo, he was "too anxious" to be an entrepreneur but the business passion didn't come from within. Interestingly, there was no Twitter hash tag defined for the event, and and only one audience question was asked via Twitter.  Claire, the interviewer, really grilled Evan on Twitter's hiring practices & approach towards women at the company, and in tech in general.  So, a question for the comments - do you think he responded appropriately?  Should he have to be fielding those types of questions in an interview setting like the one last night?  Evan mentioned that Twitter hires women when it can, but Twitter won't hire someone "just because she's a woman."  Is that the right approach or the wrong approach?  Should there be a quota for women in tech? In the video below, Evan comments on: The emphasis on hiring women at Twitter (he says 25% to 30% of the Twitter workforce is female) Michael Arrington's post about the dearth of women in tech Twitter's business model: Promoted tweets are the main initiative for generating revenue on Twitter. Promoted tweets may be inserted into people's regular tweets based on "what you're interested in, where you are, and what you write about" about "Early bird tweets" , which were an experiment, and while still going on, although it's a "side project" now. how "90 million tweets were written today" whether or not Twitter could become a public company.  "Seems like there's a chance," Evan said Whether he can remain CEO as the company grows Twitter's main challenge currently, which is "to give you the best tweets.  We want to think of more ways for you to opt in" Twitter just added a corporate marketing person What it's like to manage a rapidly growing business (50% of the workforce has been at Twitter for less than 9 months)  Evan says the main reason "big corporations suck" is because people don't trust each other. Twitter's attitude towards its role in the Iran elections, and how Twitter doesn't do anything to impede tweets unless illegal or impersonation How they decided on the 140 character limit, and how SMS was a "total hack" by the characters.  Fun fact:  At first, Twitter was 160 characters, minus your user name, minus 2 characters. What it was like to get married and become a father while balancing being an entrepreneur How Twitter tries to offer a balanced work environment, with yoga, pilates, gym memberships and food An upcoming focus on location & events Bill Gates' usage of Twitter & Facebook (and specifically the frustrations Gates had with Facebook) Thoughts on the new iPhone & iPad applications, and the changing attitude about the importance of mobile, and why Android is not in Evan's top 10 list of priorities How Twitter "imports" employees from outside Silicon Valley and outside the US

Question and Answer

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Question (from c):Just wondering from other peoples experiences.... is it good/bad to use yoga as a vice?I think its what I might have been doing last month (though there was also a 30 day challenge going on at the studio) and things were great! I was feeling so good.but I'm taking some time away from the studio this month with work/school/moving and my life seems to be falling apart.

Short answer:We call it a daily practice. It is no more a vice than brushing your teeth. Try not brushing your teeth for a month, and see what happens.

Longer Answer:

This is where the buddhists really seem to have some insight that isn't felt as fully in the yoga community.For the buddhists, the purpose of practice is the relieve the individual, and all beings everywhere of the suffering caused by the neurotic, conditioned mind. That is pretty much the whole deal. there is no promise of a 'yoga butt', no promise of a stronger back, or more flexible hips. It focuses on the fact that we are tortured by our minds, all of us, and the only way out is through consistent practice. The mind can be your best friend or your worst enemy. If you don't take serious time to train it, it will probably be the latter.

Patanjali says something similar too, in Yoga Sutra 1.14

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