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CMOs: Stand Out In The Mobile Engagement Crush

This week, Facebook Home, an Android app that will change a user’s phone home screen and core features, will make its consumer debut. 

Facebook's Home initiative is the latest salvo in the mobile engagement battle, which has been looming since the introduction of the iPhone in 2007, although most are just becoming aware of it now.  In fact, the 'engagement crush' is just beginning and will get much worse in the next few years.

This issue is so significant that CEOs and CMOs of Fortune 500 companies are going to find their jobs in jeopardy if they don't take immediate and decisive action to launch a meaningful mobile strategy for their companies.  Many companies mistakenly think their businesses do not have anything to do with mobile, but that's incorrect:  Mobile devices like smartphones and tablets are the way consumers and businesses will interact with brands and each other. This means that every business needs to have a coherent mobile strategy that at its core considers how its customer base will want to interact with it using mobile devices.

It's settled: Native Wins over HTML5. For now.

I've been blogging about mobile for six years. Including things like whether native would beat HTML5, why Facebook switched back to native from HTML5, Native vs. Web, the rise of apps, the evolving definition of ‘app’, how Fortune 1000 CEOs are going to be fired for missing the Mobile Crush, how apps have a strong distribution channel, about NPR, Nat Geo, USA Today, Washington Post & others talking about mobile strategy back in 2010, how mobile is way more than a 2nd screen, how mobile data connections will replace wifi, the future of media on mobile, the mobile engagement challenge that nobody's talking about (yet) and how there are two types of engagement to optimize for, the basics of mobile, the future of mobile advertising, mobile events like WWDC 2010, a 45 min screencast back in 2010 with some big thinking about small phones, how mobile influences social strategies, what the iPad means for media, Sprint vs. AT&T speed comparison (spoiler alert: AT&T wins by a landslide), using mobile to lifehack a check deposit from 2000 miles away, mini apps, how mobile enables the interest graph, why we founded + sold AppMakr and Socialize (and the infrastructure required to run it), Android’s growth, SDK adoption tips (and tricks), as well as what mobile might look like in the future, including a review on Google Glass, hacking Glass, Tile, the Internet of Things, and what APIs mean for mobile. So needless to say, I’m deep into mobile.

But what I just read in the First Round Review (I talk more about FRR here) just blew my mind. They write:

Bam. Mind blown. Just like that. Native wins. At least for now.

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